Password Nightmares

I had to post this here. 

I just did a password reset for my Tumblr account and I don’t understand the logic there for 8 character password. 

The password I was trying to reset to was 9 characters and the error message I kept on getting was “Password should be at least 8 characters” . I dropped the last character and it worked.

Tumblr, first fix your error message to say “Password should be 8 characters only” and if you think like me and see the sense in letting users decide to have more than 8 characters then save them the pain of having to remember 8 character password they had to come up with.

It may save your users to repeat the experience.

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Patient Surveys to rate Hospitals

I am a beliver that to deliver Accountable Care, it is necessary that patients get to rate the service they received. 

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doctorswithoutborders:

Access to Medicines: India Offers First Compulsory License Groundbreaking Move Sets Precedent for Overcoming Drug Price Barriers In a landmark case, the Indian Patent Office has issued the first-ever compulsory license in India to a generic drug manufacturer. This effectively ends German pharmaceutical company Bayer’s monopoly in India on the drug sorafenib tosylate, used to treat kidney and liver cancer. The Patent Office acted on the basis that Bayer had not only failed to price the drug at an accessible and affordable level, but that it had also failed to ensure that the medicine was available in sufficient and sustainable quantities within India. “We have been following this case closely because newer drugs to treat HIV are patented in India, and as a result are priced out of reach,” said Dr. Tido von Schoen-Angerer, director of the Doctors Without Borders Access Campaign. “But this decision marks a precedent that offers hope: it shows that new drugs under patent can also be produced by generic makers at a fraction of the price, while royalties are paid to the patent holder. This compensates patent holders while at the same time ensuring that competition can bring down prices.” Competition from the generic version will bring the price of the drug in India down dramatically, from over US$5,500 per month to close to US$175 per month — a price reduction of nearly 97 per cent.

doctorswithoutborders:

Access to Medicines: India Offers First Compulsory License

Groundbreaking Move Sets Precedent for Overcoming Drug Price Barriers

In a landmark case, the Indian Patent Office has issued the first-ever compulsory license in India to a generic drug manufacturer. This effectively ends German pharmaceutical company Bayer’s monopoly in India on the drug sorafenib tosylate, used to treat kidney and liver cancer.

The Patent Office acted on the basis that Bayer had not only failed to price the drug at an accessible and affordable level, but that it had also failed to ensure that the medicine was available in sufficient and sustainable quantities within India.

“We have been following this case closely because newer drugs to treat HIV are patented in India, and as a result are priced out of reach,” said Dr. Tido von Schoen-Angerer, director of the Doctors Without Borders Access Campaign. “But this decision marks a precedent that offers hope: it shows that new drugs under patent can also be produced by generic makers at a fraction of the price, while royalties are paid to the patent holder. This compensates patent holders while at the same time ensuring that competition can bring down prices.”

Competition from the generic version will bring the price of the drug in India down dramatically, from over US$5,500 per month to close to US$175 per month — a price reduction of nearly 97 per cent.

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doctorswithoutborders:

MSF Blogs: The Flying Creatures I Sleep With Chris Bird, a former Reuters and Guardian reporter, put down his notepad and left more than 10 years of news reporting to study medicine with the intention of returning to the front lines where he can be hands-on saving lives and alleviating the kind of suffering he once wrote about.Here he talks about his living situation in Democratic Republic of Congo while working in the field: We’ve taken over a compound from another aid agency as a temporary MSF base. “Compound,” however, is probably too grand a term for the small single-story building of mud, riddled with termite holes, its bare wooden beams roofed with corrugated iron and surrounded by a flimsy stockade of bamboo. The strong smell of ammonia pervades the building as it hosts a thriving colony of bats. They’re quiet during the day but, as I turn in, they start to scratch, screech, and shuffle about after returning from sorties to feast on the copious and diverse clouds of insects that race like electrons around the bare bulbs run by a noisy diesel generator at night. Having learned of a possible association between bats and the dreaded viral hemorrhagic fever, Ebola, I was not happy to find two of them, wings folded, clinging upside down to the mosquito net over my bed. The net is often covered with tiny black pellets each morning—bat poo. Read his previous blog post here.Photo: DRC 2011 © Frank Rammeloo/MSF Lulimba Hospital, in the Kimbi Lulenge health zone in South Kivu.

doctorswithoutborders:

MSF Blogs: The Flying Creatures I Sleep With

Chris Bird, a former Reuters and Guardian reporter, put down his notepad and left more than 10 years of news reporting to study medicine with the intention of returning to the front lines where he can be hands-on saving lives and alleviating the kind of suffering he once wrote about.

Here he talks about his living situation in Democratic Republic of Congo while working in the field:

We’ve taken over a compound from another aid agency as a temporary MSF base. “Compound,” however, is probably too grand a term for the small single-story building of mud, riddled with termite holes, its bare wooden beams roofed with corrugated iron and surrounded by a flimsy stockade of bamboo.

The strong smell of ammonia pervades the building as it hosts a thriving colony of bats. They’re quiet during the day but, as I turn in, they start to scratch, screech, and shuffle about after returning from sorties to feast on the copious and diverse clouds of insects that race like electrons around the bare bulbs run by a noisy diesel generator at night.

Having learned of a possible association between bats and the dreaded viral hemorrhagic fever, Ebola, I was not happy to find two of them, wings folded, clinging upside down to the mosquito net over my bed. The net is often covered with tiny black pellets each morning—bat poo.

Read his previous blog post here.

Photo: DRC 2011 © Frank Rammeloo/MSF Lulimba Hospital, in the Kimbi Lulenge health zone in South Kivu.

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doctorswithoutborders:

Maternal Health: An Ongoing Emergency

MSF is providing maternal and emergency obstetric care in more than 30 countries worldwide, but in places where woman cannot access care, some 1,000 die every day due to complications in pregnancy and delivery.

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"

Why are we, as a nation so obsessed with foreign things? we want foreign TVs, we want foreign shirts. We want foreign technology. Why this obsession with everything imported? Do we not realize that self-respect comes with self-reliance?

I was in Hyderabad giving this lecture, when a 14 year old girl asked me for my autograph. I asked her what her goal in life is: She replied: “I want to live in a developed India .” For her, you and I will have to built this developed India .

You must proclaim. As an aside from yours truly: India is not an under-developed nation; it is a highly developed nation in an advanced state of decay!!!!!

"

Dr. Kalam’s speech at Hyderabad
Courtesy : Rediff

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Post Card of Laxmi Villas Palace
20th July 2020
Dearest Sanika & Tanaya,
I can’t tell you how much I miss not having you be in Baroda with me for my birthday. Remember the palace we visited when you came to visit us here on my 11th birthday (wayyy back then)? Can you believe how much better it looks now on this card? You should come visit us while I still have 6 more months here for my school. We have an exchange program coming up with the Department of Journalism. Their exchange program focuses on responsible media to bring peace in South Asia. Sanika, such a perfect fit for your thesis. Tankoba, you should come with Sanika and intern here with Carl-uncle. He is a friend of my mom’s who consults for the VUDA office on how to use mobile technology to engage folks in city outskirts to continue with their commerce without leaving their villages. There is a huge effort to ensure that the villages become pockets of self-sustaining industries so that people are not forced to migrate to the cities for work. My mom helps develop the programs to support their work by involving the students from Applied Arts department in Fine Arts Faculty. You like hanging out with my mom anyway, don’t you?
Hugs…catch up with both of you on skype at 8 as usual. - M

Post Card of Laxmi Villas Palace

20th July 2020

Dearest Sanika & Tanaya,

I can’t tell you how much I miss not having you be in Baroda with me for my birthday. Remember the palace we visited when you came to visit us here on my 11th birthday (wayyy back then)? Can you believe how much better it looks now on this card? You should come visit us while I still have 6 more months here for my school. We have an exchange program coming up with the Department of Journalism. Their exchange program focuses on responsible media to bring peace in South Asia. Sanika, such a perfect fit for your thesis. Tankoba, you should come with Sanika and intern here with Carl-uncle. He is a friend of my mom’s who consults for the VUDA office on how to use mobile technology to engage folks in city outskirts to continue with their commerce without leaving their villages. There is a huge effort to ensure that the villages become pockets of self-sustaining industries so that people are not forced to migrate to the cities for work. My mom helps develop the programs to support their work by involving the students from Applied Arts department in Fine Arts Faculty. You like hanging out with my mom anyway, don’t you?

Hugs…catch up with both of you on skype at 8 as usual. - M

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Vadodara, formerly known as Baroda, is the third most populated city in the Indian State of Gujarat. It is one of four cities with a population of over 1 million. Historical and archaeological findings date this place back to the 9th century when it was a small town called Ankottaka (present Akota) located on the right bank of the river Vishvamitri (whose name is derived from the great saint Rishi Vishwamitra).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vadodara

Link to the Google Map that lists out all the places worth visiting:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=206928886048011838166.0004b1c9cdc2817bc58c1&msa=0

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